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Error location and Reading Comprehension Quiz for SBI Clerk Mains 2019
 
Question 1
Directions (1 to 5): In each of the questions below, four sentences are given. Choose the sentence that is grammatically or meaningfully incorrect. If all are correct, mark option (E) as  your answer.
Directions (1 to 5): In each of the questions below, four sentences are given. Choose the sentence that is grammatically or meaningfully incorrect. If all are correct, mark option (E) as  your answer.
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
Question 2
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
Question 3
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
Question 4
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
Question 5
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
Question 6
Directions (6 to 10): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions   The German city of Mainz lies on the banks of the River Rhine. It is most notable for its wine, its cathedral and for being the home of Johannes Gutenberg, who introduced the printing press to Europe. Although these things may seem, ...
Directions (6 to 10): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions
 
The German city of Mainz lies on the banks of the River Rhine. It is most notable for its wine, its cathedral and for being the home of Johannes Gutenberg, who introduced the printing press to Europe. Although these things may seem unconnected at first, here they overlap, merging and influencing one another. The three elements converge on market days, when local producers and winemakers sell their goods in the main square surrounding the sprawling St Martin's Cathedral. Diagonally opposite is the Gutenberg Museum, named after the city's most famous inhabitant, who was born in Mainz around 1399 and died here 550 years ago in 1468. It was Gutenberg who invented Europe's first movable metal type printing press, which started the printing revolution and marks the turning point from medieval times to modernity in the Western world. Although the Chinese were using woodblock printing many centuries earlier, with a complete printed book, made in 868, found in a cave in north-west China, movable type printing never became very popular in the East due to the importance of calligraphy, the complexity of hand-written Chinese and the large number of characters. Gutenberg's press, however, was well suited to the European writing system, and its development was heavily influenced by the area from which it came. In the Middle Ages, Mainz was one of the most important cathedral cities in the Holy Roman Empire, in which the Church and the archbishop of Mainz were the centre of influence and political power. Gutenberg, as an educated and entrepreneurial patrician, would have recognised the Church's need to update the method of replicating manuscripts, which were hand-copied by monks. This was an incredibly slow and laborious process; one that could not keep up with the growing demand for books at the time. In his book, Revolutions in Communication: Media History from Gutenberg to the Digital Age, Dr Bill Kovarik, professor of communication at Radford University in the US state of Virginia, describes this capacity in terms of 'monk power', where 'one monk' equals a day's work - about one page - for a manuscript copier. Gutenberg's press amplified the power of a monk by 200 times. At the Gutenberg Museum, I watched a demonstration of a page being printed on a replica of the press. First, a metal alloy was heated and poured into a matrix (a mould used to cast a letter). Once the alloy cooled, the small metal letters were arranged into words and sentences in a form and inked. Finally, paper was placed on top of the form and a heavy plate was pressed upon it, similar to how a wine press works. This is no coincidence: Gutenberg's printing press is thought to be a modification of the wine press. Since the Romans introduced winemaking to the region, the area around Mainz has been one of Germany's main wine-producing areas, with famous grape varieties such as Riesling, Dornfelder and Silvaner. The page that is always printed at the Gutenberg Museum replicates the original style and font of the 42-line Gutenberg Bible, the first major book ever to be printed using movable type in the Western world.
 
Which of the following part(s) of Mainz was the centre of political power?
I. Gutenberg museum
II. Archbishop of Mainz
III. St. Martin's cathedral
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
Question 7
The German city of Mainz lies on the banks of the River Rhine. It is most notable for its wine, its cathedral and for being the home of Johannes Gutenberg, who introduced the printing press to Europe. Although these things may seem unconnected at first, here they overlap, merging and influencing one another. The three elements converge on market days,, ...
The German city of Mainz lies on the banks of the River Rhine. It is most notable for its wine, its cathedral and for being the home of Johannes Gutenberg, who introduced the printing press to Europe. Although these things may seem unconnected at first, here they overlap, merging and influencing one another. The three elements converge on market days, when local producers and winemakers sell their goods in the main square surrounding the sprawling St Martin's Cathedral. Diagonally opposite is the Gutenberg Museum, named after the city's most famous inhabitant, who was born in Mainz around 1399 and died here 550 years ago in 1468. It was Gutenberg who invented Europe's first movable metal type printing press, which started the printing revolution and marks the turning point from medieval times to modernity in the Western world. Although the Chinese were using woodblock printing many centuries earlier, with a complete printed book, made in 868, found in a cave in north-west China, movable type printing never became very popular in the East due to the importance of calligraphy, the complexity of hand-written Chinese and the large number of characters. Gutenberg's press, however, was well suited to the European writing system, and its development was heavily influenced by the area from which it came. In the Middle Ages, Mainz was one of the most important cathedral cities in the Holy Roman Empire, in which the Church and the archbishop of Mainz were the centre of influence and political power. Gutenberg, as an educated and entrepreneurial patrician, would have recognised the Church's need to update the method of replicating manuscripts, which were hand-copied by monks. This was an incredibly slow and laborious process; one that could not keep up with the growing demand for books at the time. In his book, Revolutions in Communication: Media History from Gutenberg to the Digital Age, Dr Bill Kovarik, professor of communication at Radford University in the US state of Virginia, describes this capacity in terms of 'monk power', where 'one monk' equals a day's work - about one page - for a manuscript copier. Gutenberg's press amplified the power of a monk by 200 times. At the Gutenberg Museum, I watched a demonstration of a page being printed on a replica of the press. First, a metal alloy was heated and poured into a matrix (a mould used to cast a letter). Once the alloy cooled, the small metal letters were arranged into words and sentences in a form and inked. Finally, paper was placed on top of the form and a heavy plate was pressed upon it, similar to how a wine press works. This is no coincidence: Gutenberg's printing press is thought to be a modification of the wine press. Since the Romans introduced winemaking to the region, the area around Mainz has been one of Germany's main wine-producing areas, with famous grape varieties such as Riesling, Dornfelder and Silvaner. The page that is always printed at the Gutenberg Museum replicates the original style and font of the 42-line Gutenberg Bible, the first major book ever to be printed using movable type in the Western world.
 
Which of the following contributed to the movable type printing, never becoming popular in the East?
I. The importance of calligraphy
II. The complexity of hand-written Chinese
III. The large number of characters
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
Question 8
The German city of Mainz lies on the banks of the River Rhine. It is most notable for its wine, its cathedral and for being the home of Johannes Gutenberg, who introduced the printing press to Europe. Although these things may seem unconnected at first, here they overlap, merging and influencing one another. The three elements converge on market days,, ...
The German city of Mainz lies on the banks of the River Rhine. It is most notable for its wine, its cathedral and for being the home of Johannes Gutenberg, who introduced the printing press to Europe. Although these things may seem unconnected at first, here they overlap, merging and influencing one another. The three elements converge on market days, when local producers and winemakers sell their goods in the main square surrounding the sprawling St Martin's Cathedral. Diagonally opposite is the Gutenberg Museum, named after the city's most famous inhabitant, who was born in Mainz around 1399 and died here 550 years ago in 1468. It was Gutenberg who invented Europe's first movable metal type printing press, which started the printing revolution and marks the turning point from medieval times to modernity in the Western world. Although the Chinese were using woodblock printing many centuries earlier, with a complete printed book, made in 868, found in a cave in north-west China, movable type printing never became very popular in the East due to the importance of calligraphy, the complexity of hand-written Chinese and the large number of characters. Gutenberg's press, however, was well suited to the European writing system, and its development was heavily influenced by the area from which it came. In the Middle Ages, Mainz was one of the most important cathedral cities in the Holy Roman Empire, in which the Church and the archbishop of Mainz were the centre of influence and political power. Gutenberg, as an educated and entrepreneurial patrician, would have recognised the Church's need to update the method of replicating manuscripts, which were hand-copied by monks. This was an incredibly slow and laborious process; one that could not keep up with the growing demand for books at the time. In his book, Revolutions in Communication: Media History from Gutenberg to the Digital Age, Dr Bill Kovarik, professor of communication at Radford University in the US state of Virginia, describes this capacity in terms of 'monk power', where 'one monk' equals a day's work - about one page - for a manuscript copier. Gutenberg's press amplified the power of a monk by 200 times. At the Gutenberg Museum, I watched a demonstration of a page being printed on a replica of the press. First, a metal alloy was heated and poured into a matrix (a mould used to cast a letter). Once the alloy cooled, the small metal letters were arranged into words and sentences in a form and inked. Finally, paper was placed on top of the form and a heavy plate was pressed upon it, similar to how a wine press works. This is no coincidence: Gutenberg's printing press is thought to be a modification of the wine press. Since the Romans introduced winemaking to the region, the area around Mainz has been one of Germany's main wine-producing areas, with famous grape varieties such as Riesling, Dornfelder and Silvaner. The page that is always printed at the Gutenberg Museum replicates the original style and font of the 42-line Gutenberg Bible, the first major book ever to be printed using movable type in the Western world.
 
Riesling, Dornfelder and Silvaner are the categories of what?
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
Question 9
The German city of Mainz lies on the banks of the River Rhine. It is most notable for its wine, its cathedral and for being the home of Johannes Gutenberg, who introduced the printing press to Europe. Although these things may seem unconnected at first, here they overlap, merging and influencing one another. The three elements converge on market days,, ...
The German city of Mainz lies on the banks of the River Rhine. It is most notable for its wine, its cathedral and for being the home of Johannes Gutenberg, who introduced the printing press to Europe. Although these things may seem unconnected at first, here they overlap, merging and influencing one another. The three elements converge on market days, when local producers and winemakers sell their goods in the main square surrounding the sprawling St Martin's Cathedral. Diagonally opposite is the Gutenberg Museum, named after the city's most famous inhabitant, who was born in Mainz around 1399 and died here 550 years ago in 1468. It was Gutenberg who invented Europe's first movable metal type printing press, which started the printing revolution and marks the turning point from medieval times to modernity in the Western world. Although the Chinese were using woodblock printing many centuries earlier, with a complete printed book, made in 868, found in a cave in north-west China, movable type printing never became very popular in the East due to the importance of calligraphy, the complexity of hand-written Chinese and the large number of characters. Gutenberg's press, however, was well suited to the European writing system, and its development was heavily influenced by the area from which it came. In the Middle Ages, Mainz was one of the most important cathedral cities in the Holy Roman Empire, in which the Church and the archbishop of Mainz were the centre of influence and political power. Gutenberg, as an educated and entrepreneurial patrician, would have recognised the Church's need to update the method of replicating manuscripts, which were hand-copied by monks. This was an incredibly slow and laborious process; one that could not keep up with the growing demand for books at the time. In his book, Revolutions in Communication: Media History from Gutenberg to the Digital Age, Dr Bill Kovarik, professor of communication at Radford University in the US state of Virginia, describes this capacity in terms of 'monk power', where 'one monk' equals a day's work - about one page - for a manuscript copier. Gutenberg's press amplified the power of a monk by 200 times. At the Gutenberg Museum, I watched a demonstration of a page being printed on a replica of the press. First, a metal alloy was heated and poured into a matrix (a mould used to cast a letter). Once the alloy cooled, the small metal letters were arranged into words and sentences in a form and inked. Finally, paper was placed on top of the form and a heavy plate was pressed upon it, similar to how a wine press works. This is no coincidence: Gutenberg's printing press is thought to be a modification of the wine press. Since the Romans introduced winemaking to the region, the area around Mainz has been one of Germany's main wine-producing areas, with famous grape varieties such as Riesling, Dornfelder and Silvaner. The page that is always printed at the Gutenberg Museum replicates the original style and font of the 42-line Gutenberg Bible, the first major book ever to be printed using movable type in the Western world.
 
Which of the following is Mainz famous for?
I. Its wine
II. Its cathedral
III. For being the home of Johannes Gutenberg
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
Question 10
The German city of Mainz lies on the banks of the River Rhine. It is most notable for its wine, its cathedral and for being the home of Johannes Gutenberg, who introduced the printing press to Europe. Although these things may seem unconnected at first, here they overlap, merging and influencing one another. The three elements converge on market days,, ...
The German city of Mainz lies on the banks of the River Rhine. It is most notable for its wine, its cathedral and for being the home of Johannes Gutenberg, who introduced the printing press to Europe. Although these things may seem unconnected at first, here they overlap, merging and influencing one another. The three elements converge on market days, when local producers and winemakers sell their goods in the main square surrounding the sprawling St Martin's Cathedral. Diagonally opposite is the Gutenberg Museum, named after the city's most famous inhabitant, who was born in Mainz around 1399 and died here 550 years ago in 1468. It was Gutenberg who invented Europe's first movable metal type printing press, which started the printing revolution and marks the turning point from medieval times to modernity in the Western world. Although the Chinese were using woodblock printing many centuries earlier, with a complete printed book, made in 868, found in a cave in north-west China, movable type printing never became very popular in the East due to the importance of calligraphy, the complexity of hand-written Chinese and the large number of characters. Gutenberg's press, however, was well suited to the European writing system, and its development was heavily influenced by the area from which it came. In the Middle Ages, Mainz was one of the most important cathedral cities in the Holy Roman Empire, in which the Church and the archbishop of Mainz were the centre of influence and political power. Gutenberg, as an educated and entrepreneurial patrician, would have recognised the Church's need to update the method of replicating manuscripts, which were hand-copied by monks. This was an incredibly slow and laborious process; one that could not keep up with the growing demand for books at the time. In his book, Revolutions in Communication: Media History from Gutenberg to the Digital Age, Dr Bill Kovarik, professor of communication at Radford University in the US state of Virginia, describes this capacity in terms of 'monk power', where 'one monk' equals a day's work - about one page - for a manuscript copier. Gutenberg's press amplified the power of a monk by 200 times. At the Gutenberg Museum, I watched a demonstration of a page being printed on a replica of the press. First, a metal alloy was heated and poured into a matrix (a mould used to cast a letter). Once the alloy cooled, the small metal letters were arranged into words and sentences in a form and inked. Finally, paper was placed on top of the form and a heavy plate was pressed upon it, similar to how a wine press works. This is no coincidence: Gutenberg's printing press is thought to be a modification of the wine press. Since the Romans introduced winemaking to the region, the area around Mainz has been one of Germany's main wine-producing areas, with famous grape varieties such as Riesling, Dornfelder and Silvaner. The page that is always printed at the Gutenberg Museum replicates the original style and font of the 42-line Gutenberg Bible, the first major book ever to be printed using movable type in the Western world.
 
Why does the author say that Gutenberg's press was well suited to the European writing system?
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E

     

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